News - November 2012

Tawny-crowned Pygmy-Tyrant
Euscarthmus meloryphus
Tawny-crowned Pygmy-Tyrant
24-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro
Green-barred Woodpecker
Colaptes melanochloros
Green-barred Woodpecker
24-11-12 © Juan Pablo Muszkats
Guira Cuckoo
Guira guira
Guira Cuckoo
24-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro
Guira Cuckoo
24-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro
I am off to the Viamonte foodstand to find something to eat. I got this tasty morsel. Is it sweetbread or thin skirt?
Spectacled Tyrant
Hymenops perspicillatus
Spectacled Tyrant
24-11-12 © Juan Pablo Muszkats
Spectacled Tyrant
24-11-12 © Juan Pablo Muszkats
Glittering-bellied Emerald
Chlorostilbon lucidus
Glittering-bellied Emerald
24-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro
Rufous Hornero
Furnarius rufus
Rufous Hornero
24-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro

Nest near the antenna. The adult went in and out several times carrying ffood for the chicks

Rufous Hornero
24-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro

Checkered Woodpecker
Veniliornis mixtus
Checkered Woodpecker
24-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro
Checkered Woodpecker
24-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro
Checkered Woodpecker
24-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro
Checkered Woodpecker
24-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro
Checkered Woodpecker
24-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro
A checkered woodpecker's nest with chicks inside. The male brought food on several occasions. The chicks must be very little judging by the way the adult gets in

Rufous-sided Crake
Laterallus melanophaius
Rufous-sided Crake
24-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro
Rufous-sided Crake
24-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro
Tropical Kingbird
Tyrannus melancholicus
Tropical Kingbird
24-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian
Sooty-fronted Spinetail
Synallaxis frontalis
Sooty-fronted Spinetail
24-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian
Brown-chested Martin
Progne tapera
Brown-chested Martin
24-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian
Glittering-bellied Emerald
Chlorostilbon lucidus
Glittering-bellied Emerald
24-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian
Warbling Doradito
Pseudocolopteryx flaviventris
Warbling Doradito
24-11-12 © Pablo Mosto
Dark-billed Cuckoo
Coccyzus melacoryphus
Dark-billed Cuckoo
24-11-12 © Pablo Mosto

Streaked Flycatcher
Myiodynastes maculatus
Streaked Flycatcher
25-11-12 © Carlos González Ledo

The Streaked Flycatcher is a migrant bird which nests in Costanera. Every year they fly back and forth from northern South America to Argentina. It breeds here and goes back north to spend the austral winter. Out of the seven recognized subspecies of Streaked Flycatcher, <em>Myiodynastes maculatus solitarius</em> is the one that migrates to Argentina.<br /><br />Year after year we can count on this flycatcher. They stay from October to March approximately. As they arrive they have to establish their territory. They make a lot of fuss when they chase each other with rapid flights manouvering among trees and singing loudly. It is difficult to follow the scene since they get out of sight easily. They also compete against other species for holes in trees, like those of woodpeckers', where they will nest.




It rains under the tipu trees
Spittlebug
Cephissus siccifolius
Spittlebug
11-11-12 © Carlos González Ledo
When November comes and tipu trees become green again an unusual phenomenon is witnessed for only a couple of weeks - it rains under the tipu trees no matter if it is a sunny or cloudy day. This is caused by an insect, the spittlebug, whose nymph feeds on this tree's sap. The nymph produces a spittle mass around the stalks which is a good cover against predators and keeps it moist. The foam is the waste product eliminated after sap nutrients have been absorbed, into which air bubbles are introduced through a breathing tube which is at the end of the abdomen of the nymphs
Spittlebug
11-11-12 © Carlos González Ledo
When the spittle masses become too heavy they disintegrate into drops. This is known as "the weeping of the tipu trees". If dripping is intense puddles are formed on the ground.
Spittlebug
10-11-12 © Cora Rimoldi



Two exotics Estornino pinto-mora/Sturnus vulgaris-mulberry Man has always moved with his culture on his back throughout history. For whatever reason: cultural nostalgia, economic reasons, deliberately or accidentally the introduction of plant and animals has caused in the receiving environment an unequal struggle. The exotics have no their natural predators which control the spread of the population to such an extent that they grow out of control and become pests. This caused the regression of the autoctonous flora and fauna and became a call to attention, which has lead the Government to legislate on the protection and conservation of native flora and fauna. Nevertheless, fulfilment of the law is still not a priority.

In this photo two introduced species: the European Starling
Sturnus vulgaris with a fruit of the Mulberry Tree
Morus nigra in its bill. This tree is native to Eurasia. Its fruit is fleshy and purple and is highly appreciated by birds which disseminate the seeds. In the reserve this tree has easily spread. The first records of the European Starling in Buenos Aires date back to the late ’80. According to investigations it has expanded along the coast of the Province of Buenos Aires till Mar del Tuyú. At Costanera this is a resident bird and its presence was first recorded in 1997 as Germán Pugnali points out. It is very aggressive: it pushes native birds or migratory birds in their competence for food and nests. It is opportunistic: it makes do with anything it can get. It has a high rate of reproduction: it would almost double their population yearly.

The negative impact this bird caused at an economic an ecological level in other countries where it was also introduced have been broadly investigated. We must learn from this to avoid this situation. Population growth is so fast that it becomes imperative to take measures to erradicate this species before it is too late. CR

New bird species
White-throated Hummingbird
Leucochloris albicollis
White-throated Hummingbird
14-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian
White-throated Hummingbird
14-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian
White-throated Hummingbird
14-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian

Brazilian Teal
Amazonetta brasiliensis
Brazilian Teal
14-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian
Brazilian Teal
14-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian
Black-and-rufous Warbling-Finch
Poospiza nigrorufa
Black-and-rufous Warbling-Finch
11-11-12 © Carlos González Ledo
Yellow-billed Teal
Anas flavirostris
Yellow-billed Teal
11-11-12 © Carlos González Ledo
Bran-colored Flycatcher
Myiophobus fasciatus
Bran-colored Flycatcher
11-11-12 © Carlos González Ledo

Goblet flower
Cypella herbertii
Lirio del bajo/Goblet flower© Carlos Gonzalez Ledo
Visit to the Raptor Rehabilitation Center
Águila coronada/Crowned EagleCrowned Eagle
Harpyhaliaetus coronatus © Carlos Gonzalez Ledo
Taguató común anillado/Ringed Roadside HawkRinged juvenile Roadside Hawk
Buteo magnirostris © Jesús Fernández
Learn the activities of this center. Read interview with Andrés Capdevielle who is in charge of the Raptor Rehabilitation Center in the reserve

Small-billed Elaenia
Elaenia parvirostris
Small-billed Elaenia
03-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro
Rufous Hornero
Furnarius rufus
Rufous Hornero
03-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro
Greyish Baywing
Agelaioides badius
Greyish Baywing
03-11-12 © Claudia y Tito Di Mauro

Welcoming visitors


White-winged Becard
Pachyramphus polychopterus
White-winged Becard
03-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian
White-winged Becard
03-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian
White-winged Becard
03-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian
White-winged Becard
03-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian
White-winged Becard
03-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian
It seems this male becard does not like juicy mulberries. It crushes one after the other against the branch forcing the juice out before eating them

European Starling
Sturnus vulgaris
European Starling
03-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian
Monk Parakeet
Myiopsitta monachus
Monk Parakeet
03-11-12 © J. Simón Tagtachian